FREQUENTLY ASKED QUESTIONS

IP Transport

How long does configuration and shipping the Haivision IP Gateway take?


We use Priority Mail. Shipping can take anywhere from 5-10 business days after your order has been received and processed. We will confirm once your order has been received and send a tracking number once your order has been configured and shipped to you.




What is your refund policy?


Unfortunately, for the intergrity of our company, services, and time constraints all Haivision IP Gateway servers are NON-REFUNDABLE. Items may be exchanged upon review but is totally up to the discretion of the merchant. (Exchanges are not guaranteed). For any additional question don't hesitate to contact us at philip@gulfcom.net




Can we (the Customer) get more info about the IP device inputs and outputs? Also, would like to know whether we are going to be making use of a tunnel for IP streams, whether it's unicast or multicast? We would like to have an IP output for re-integration into our already existing IP content.


To complete the IP configuration of the Haivision IP Streaming Gateway server we're going to be sending to you, please supply the following information. Make sure your IT department configures your firewall, and any other devices that may be in the IP path, with the following information. Delivery of the Gulfcom Package of signals over I.P. requires: Public Internet: Bandwidth to meet the total delivery size of channels purchased Hardware: Haivision Media Gateway with either 100mbps, 200mbps or 500mbps Haivision Output: UDP Multicast IP Stream Setup of System:

  1. Gulfcom will be streaming from our source IP address provided by Gulfcom.
  2. Gulfcom will be streaming to the destination IP address provided by the customer.
  3. Gulfcom will be using a UDP port between 9000 & 9049 for the IP stream. This will be determined at time of final configuration.
  4. Gulfcom will be using port 49155 to finish the configuration via remote. The customer must port-forward this port to port 80 (or 443) of the receive server.
  5. The receive server will be configured with an internal IP address of 192.168.6.151
  6. The subnet will be 255.255.255.0
  7. The gateway will be 192.168.6.1
  8. Gulfcom requires the destination (customer supplied) IP configuration of the destination streaming device, plus the multicast address and port that our streaming box will be sending the stream to.
  9. Customer to verify the reception and order of channels delivered via I.P.
Secure Reliable Transport (SRT) is a UDP-based transport technology that optimizes streaming performance across unpredictable networks. SRT is applied to contribution and distribution endpoints as part of a video stream workflow to deliver the best quality and lowest latency video at all times.
  • SRT detects and adapts to the real-time network conditions between the two endpoints.
  • SRT helps compensate for jitter and bandwidth fluctuations due to congestion over noisy networks.
  • Error recovery mechanism minimizes the packet loss typical of Internet connections.
  • AES 128/256 bit encryption is also supported for end-to-end security, keeping your streams safe from prying eyes.




Do we only need two multicast output ip addresses and ports. Correct?


Select TV is configuring the server to send to you, and you've supplied the multicast addresses to send the two streams to, but Select TV needs/requires the physical address of the output Network Interface Card (NIC) port. For example, 192.168.x.y, 172.20.x.y, or is there a specific address you'd like to use? Plus the multicast IP (192.120.x.y) port 50500?




Besides the public IP already shared and multicast IP addresses confirmed you need to put an IP on the output interface to us (customer)? What determines this output IP?


Customer Question continued: This multicast stream is going to be dumped into a vlan already carrying other multicast traffic to those very same interfaces waiting to receive your channels. However I don't think it would be wise to plug in an ip address based on the network created in that vlan as we are doing multicast routing and have a multicast router. The ip address correct me if I am wrong has to be out of that range so it doesn't try to use the multicast router on that vlan. I would pick a random ip address for that interface if that is so. Gulfcom Answer: The output Network Interface Card (NIC) was configured with a 192.168.1.15 IP address. However, once the server is connected to the internet at your destination, Gulfcom can easily change the NIC address as required by the customer. The server has two NICs. One is for the internet connection that receives the streams from Gulfcom, and the second NIC is an output NIC that streams the channels to your downstream equipment. There is a one page configuration sheet included in the box that has the current configuration. The server has a small piece of green painters tape at the back left corner (when viewed from the back) that identifies where each NIC needs to be plugged into. Once the server is rack mounted, powered up, and connected to the internet, it will automatically connect to our streaming source server. No intervention required. All Gulfcom has to do at that point is configure the output NIC with the customer’s IP information stated, and turn streaming on to the supplied multicast addresses.




We just received the server and racked it up and powered on today. It is already accessible via public interface however we would like to get the IP address on the multicast interface changed, is this possible? Apparently on our multicast streaming vlan we have another device streaming on these IP addresses.


Gulfcom will change the configuration, once supplied by the customer and let you know.




How do we (the Customer) proceed once the interface is connected to multicast stream vlan? Is there a list of multicast streaming addresses and ports for channels or do we have to log into device to get that info?


All channels in the multicast streams are present on the supplied multicast IPs. If you have TSReader, StreamXpert, or some other Transport Stream (TS) monitoring program, you'll see the channels within the stream(s). The stream(s) are Multi Program Transport Streams (MPTS). Your downstream IPTV Re multiplexer (MUX) will have to separate the stream(s) from the Multi Program Transport Stream(s) to Single Program Transport Stream (SPTS). If you have PotPlayer or VLC, connecting your laptop to the multicast network and entering your customer supplied multicast information (eg. udp://@224.60.1.1:5000 or udp://@224.60.2.1:5000), you'll get a random channel in that Multi Program Transport Stream, as these two programs are single channel video players.




Are the channels just pulled from the Multi Program Stream(s) and there is no need to tamper with the Haivision IP box?


Correct on both counts.




Can Gulfcom provide background information regarding copyright laws for retransmission of the over-the-air signals Gulfcom offers?


Below is the legal background established and proven for decades in the Western Hemisphere with regards to the reception, transporting and retransmission of the over-the-air signals Gulfcom offers. Gulfcom receives over-the-air television signals (the “Signals”) in Canada and then transports the Signals from Canada for reception and retransmission by television systems around the world to their subscribers. Gulfcom does not alter the content of the Signals in any way, and only supplies the Signals to television systems that it believes have been duly authorized under local law to operate in the jurisdiction in which they are located. The retransmission of distant over-the-air television signals is very common in Canada, the U.S., Latin America and many other countries globally. In fact, cable television systems in Canada and the U.S. were originally formed to facilitate the reception of television signals that their subscribers could not receive in acceptable quality using a traditional off-air antenna. The distant signals were supplied to the cable television head-ends initially by terrestrial microwave and then subsequently also by satellite and terrestrial fibre. In Canada, many subscribers to cable television systems could receive more than 50 distant Canadian and U.S. signals. Gulfcom is one of numerous entities that provide transport services for the delivery of over-the-air television signals to television systems on a distant basis. The retransmission of distant signals in a country (the “Retransmission Jurisdiction”) will be governed by the local laws of the Retransmission Jurisdiction, such as copyright and broadcasting laws. It will not be determined by the laws of the jurisdictions in which the signals originate. In this regard, we understand that U.S. courts have confirmed that U.S. copyright law does not have extraterritorial effect. There are a variety of approaches to the retransmission of distant signals that could be taken under the laws of the Retransmission Jurisdiction. The first is to impose no requirements so that the retransmission of distant signals does not require the consent of the originating broadcasters or of copyright owners in the retransmitted programming or the payment of any consideration to such broadcasters or owners. This was the approach that was followed in Canada until 1989, and we understand that it is currently followed by some countries. The second is provide a compulsory licensing regime for the retransmission of distant signals. A compulsory licensing regime is one in which a person is authorized to make use of copyrighted works without the consent of the copyright owner provided that such person pays a royalty approved by the government, a regulatory agency or some independent third party. These royalties are then distributed to the copyright owners, usually by a collective of owners having a similar interest. Canada adopted such a regime in 1989 following an amendment to its copyright law. The third is to require the consent of the originating broadcasters and/or the owners of copyright in the content of the signal to the retransmission of the signal. The U.S. requires the consent of the originating broadcaster to retransmissions of distant signals within the U.S. No such consent will be required unless the laws of the Retransmission Jurisdiction expressly impose such a consent requirement in its copyright or broadcasting laws. Gulfcom conducts its reception and transporting activities in Canada. The Canadian Copyright Act expressly provides that a person who merely transports a signal to a retransmitter does not commit an infringement of Canadian copyright and therefore does not require the consent of the copyright owner and is not required to pay a royalty. Such a person is commonly referred to as a “passive carrier”, and the exemption from copyright liability is commonly referred to as the “passive carrier exemption”. A similar exemption is provided under U.S. copyright law. Gulfcom, like numerous other entities in Canada and the U.S., is a passive carrier. Gulfcom’s reception and transporting activity falls within the passive carrier exemption, and such activity does not require the consent of the originators of the Signals and is in accordance with Canadian copyright law. As noted above, it is the laws of the Retransmission Jurisdiction that will govern the retransmission of distant signals in that jurisdiction. Thus, the retransmission of the Signals to the subscribers of the television systems served by Gulfcom will not require the consent of the originating broadcaster unless the Retransmission Jurisdiction expressly imposes such a consent requirement in its copyright or broadcasting laws. No consent will be required if there is a compulsory licensing regime in place under the copyright laws of the Retransmission Jurisdiction or the Retransmission Jurisdiction does not extend any copyright protection to the retransmission of over-the-air signals, and if the Retransmission Jurisdiction does not impose a consent requirement under its local broadcasting laws. The delivery of this memorandum to you by Gulfcom does not constitute the provision of legal advice by us to you, and does not create any solicitor-client relationship of any kind between us and you. This memorandum is not a legal opinion and you should not act on the basis of the information in this memorandum without first seeking your own legal advice. This memorandum was prepared in English. If Gulfcom provides you with a translation of this memorandum, the English version will govern in the event of a conflict with the translated version. If you have any further questions, email us at philip@gulfcom.net




Who are Gulfcom’s customers and how does Gulfcom Transport channels to them?


Gulfcom transports channels only to Operators located worldwide. Gulfcom’s customers are Operators that include Cable, Telco, Satellite (DTH), IPTV, OTT and ISP systems, along with Resorts, Army Bases & Marinas with large enough TV Platforms. Gulfcom only provides a Business-to-Business (B2B) service. Gulfcom does not sell channels directly to the public/viewer. Gulfcom transports channels over IP because not all Operators globally can "see" the satellite we use, as the footprint for it covers only North, Central & South America. IP transport is not a replacement for satellite, it's just a different method of transporting the channels to Operators. Gulfcom transports the same channels to satellite as we do for IP. Instead of an Operator having to buy multiple satellite receivers, we can now send the entire channel package via IP to the Operator, who then integrates the channels into their headend as they see fit.




What is required from a Cable Operator, Satellite DTH Operator, Telco Operator or IPTV Operator to receive Gulfcom's channels within their different platforms?


With the Haivision Media Gateway being utilized by the Operator (Gulfcom’s Customer), the output stream is IP Multicast UDP with all channels in MP4 format. Any further format conversion is up to the individual Operator, based on their headend requirements and/or needs. For example, converting the IP digital channels from MP4 to analogue or MP2 formats. If the Operator does not have an IP MP4 capable headend, then any extra transcoding, converting, and/or signal processing is up to the Operator.




Does the Haivision Media Gateway assist with converting or transcoding the channels received?


The Haivision Media Gateway units do not transcode. That is left up to the individual Operator (Customer). The Haivision server is merely a "handshake" for passing along the MP4 channels into the Operators unique platforms, whatever that may be (eg. Cable, Telco, Satellite, IPTV, OTT, etc…). If the Operator does not have an IP MP4 capable headend, then any extra transcoding, converting, and/or signal processing is up to the Operator. Gulfcom transports the channels via IP, in MP4 format to the Operators headend. If the Operator requires any other format, then it's up to them to do so, based on their headend requirements and/or needs. For example, converting the MP4 IP digital channels to MP2 or to analogue.




What format/wrapper are the channels transported to us (the Operator) in?


An IP Terminal Stream (TS) over SRT multicast, with all channels in MP4 format. Gulfcom utilizes the Haivision Media Gateway to transport and for the Operator to recieve the channels at a broadcast quality level.




How can we sample Gulfcom's IP Signals?


Gulfcom can provide on request, individual SRT channel sample links (eg. srt://123.231.32:1432) which can be easily viewed on any desktop computer using VLC player when put in the 'Open Network' tab. These channel links will be active for only a specified sampling period. The primary purpose of the SRT streams provided are just to monitor/sample the feed over VLC on a laptop or desktop computer, and not to ingest into a rebroadcast app. Yet, from my understanding VLC and FFMPEG do support functions to retransmit SRT streams in different formats to other destinations (we don’t typically recommend this). We recommend using a Haivision Media Gateway server to best receive and test the channels within your platform. A Haivision server can be purchased and pre-configured through Gulfcom or arrangements for a loner can be made. Once you have your Haivision server, Gulfcom will then send an IP Terminal Stream (TS) over SRT multicast, with all channels requested for sample in MP4 video and AC3 Audio format. The Haivision output stream is IP Multicast UDP with all channels in MP4 and AC3 Audio format. Any further format conversion is up to the individual Operator, based on their headend requirements and/or needs. For example, converting the IP digital channels from MP4 to analogue or MP2 formats. Once the Haivision server is connected to the internet at your destination, we can easily change the NIC address as required by the customer. The server has two NICs. One is for the internet connection that receives the streams from Gulfcom, and the second NIC is an output NIC that streams the channels to your downstream equipment. The stream(s) are Multi Program Transport Streams (MPTS). Your downstream IPTV Re multiplexer (MUX) will have to separate the stream(s) from the Multi Program Transport Stream(s) to Single Program Transport Stream (SPTS). See the Haivision Media Gateway Data Sheet for your reference: Haivision Gateway @ 100 Mbps - (Can receive up to 25 channels) or Haivision Rack-Mountable Gateway @ 200 Mbps - (Can receive up to 50 channels) or Haivision Rack-Mountable Gateway @ 500 Mbps - (50+ channels)





Satellite Delivery

How does a Pay-TV Operator receive Gulfcom's signals by satellite?


Gulfcom’s network is currently on the SES-3 Satellite in C-Band, which has one of the strongest signal patterns across the USA, Canada, Caribbean and Central America. Gulfcom signals are transmitted in Mpeg 4-C band using the Cisco-Scientified Atlanta (S.A.) Powervu Digital Systems, which are designed for commercial rather than residential applications. This extremely flexible system also allows for ease of conversion to most local digital platforms. List of available Cisco Receivers SATELLITE - SES 3 103.0 West Latitude 3.820 Rx (1330 L-Band) Vertical Network ID: 3 Modulation (DVB-S2 8PSK) SR (Symbol Rate) (28.0) FEC: Auto (Currently 3/4) Scientific Atlanta (CISCO) POWERVU+ Subscribe to get Gulfcom's Technical Notices: www.gulfcom.net/tech-updates Technical Support: techsupport@gulfcom.net 1 (416) 410-6621 ​ Test our Services: philip@gulfcom.net 1 (416) 768-7436





Technical Support:

techsupport@gulfcom.net

1 (416) 410-6621​

Test our Services:

philip@gulfcom.net

1 (416) 768-7436

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